In my scattered spontaneity earlier this summer I decided I would host a “book club” via a Facebook Group. I started a Facebook group only because I was advised it would be a good idea, somehow supporting my writing, the book club came about simply as a need to “do” something as a group. So here we are Facebook grouping together. I chose a book that would be good for me to read since I offer you a thought on courage on a weekly basis. The title is “Do It Scared” written by Ruth Soukup. As a group we’ve been slogging along through the content, that is, until now. Now, it’s time to move from slog to jog and take action.

Ruth says, on several occasions in her book, “Action is the antidote to fear.” This is wise advice. When you allow your fears to hold you back and paralyze you from moving into the good things that God has for you, you’re letting the feeling of fear win. I say feeling because it’s this emotional kind of fear that can control our physical ability to move forward if we don’t learn how to tame it. That’s why the book has such an appropriate title “Do It Scared.” Literally you will feel scared until you take action and move through your fear.

Do you realize there is a whole other form of fear that most of us deal with at some point in our life?

I’ve spent the last six months probing courage for all of its essence and the last six weeks learning about fear, thanks to the book, and have found they have a very unlikely intersection. They converge in relationships. There is a space where courage and fear are essentially the same, that space is something we call trust. A few years ago, when I was home schooling my kiddos, I learned about an invention that Leonardo DaVinci conceived during his stent working as a military engineer. It’s called the DaVinci bridge. The design is so fascinating I actually purchased my own model.

The military at that time was in need of a solution to transport large supplies of ammunition and the like during combat. When they would reach a creek or river crossing, they would be forced to travel miles out of their way to find a land bridge to pass and then spend days backtracking to their original route. That is until the DaVinci Bridge.

This bridge uses the weight and natural force created by stacking its precut logs together, very similar to Lincoln logs, to form a stable walkway that could be crossed. DaVinci designed this bridge in a way that they could carry it with them and erect as needed on the go. No mortar necessary. The simple act of fitting one piece together at a time was all that was needed. Quick to build and quick to tear down.

Eventually, when the bridge was built there would a time to cross over, testing its ability to sustain the weight of the people and supplies that were being transported. The test would call for both courage and fear, a complete balance. I call this trust. Trust requires both courage and fear.

Trust is both hard to build and easy to tear down. This week’s post is about facing your fear. If you’ve been hurt by people and trusting them is hard for you, you are not alone.

I encourage you to begin building bridges to cross, one person at a time. The only thing that can heal you of this kind of fear is your own courage.

You’ve got this.

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